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Ephemeral Artwork - April 7th, 2012

Creating Ephemeral Artwork with dirt and stencils of endangered species

Please join us in creating a temporary work of art outside at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum's Taylor Plaza on April 7, 2012 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Artist Daniel Richmond will guide us in utilizing a set of over one hundred stencils that present the names of Arizona's endangered species: an official listing that includes numerous threatened animals including the critically endangered Jaguar and the Aplomado Falcon.

Over the past year and a half, artist Daniel Richmond has been embossing the actual names of endangered species from individual state government's official listings in various locales and public plazas using colored earth. These works are ephemeral and made with the help of students, volunteers and by-passers from four years old to all ages. The designs take a few hours to make and last only as long as the weather or foot traffic permits(usually from 1-3 days) They leave no damage as they are natural dirt, applied to stencils on the ground from hand-held plastic bottles. The earth has no added dyes or mediums. Many of these works can be seen at:animal-report.blogspot.com.

Artist Bio:

Daniel Richmond moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico from Vermont during the summer of 2009 to attend the MFA program in Studio Art and teach at the University of New Mexico.

Richmond's recent works are often ephemeral, participatory and involve language that references the endangered nature of many global species and cultures. His recent projects include public works at the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture and the International Folk Art Museum, Santa Fe (2011); Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland (2011); Market Square Park, Ohio City (2011); The Albuquerque Civic Plaza, Albuquerque (2010); and the Bri Bri Talamanca Indigenous Territory, Central America (2010).

His work has been reviewed in numerous newspapers and periodicals including The New York Times; Sculpture; The Tico Times; Albuquerque Sunday Journal and the Isthmus.