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Research and Conservation in Southern Sonora, Mexico

Pseudobombax palmeri (cuajilote)

A small tree found at the upper limit of tropical deciduous forest and into the lower oak zone. The trunk and main branches
are semisucclent and thus thicker than those of "normal" trees. The flowers appear in March.

The genus Pseudobombax is distinguished from Bombax by the relatively small petals and the numerous, large stamens that
form the conspicuous part of the flower (the "shaving brush" form). Bombax flowers have large petals and relatively few and
smaller stamens.

The plated bark of Pseudobombax palmeri is distinctive, though it might be confused with that of Lysiloma divaricata which is a more erect, nonsucculent tree. Photos: Mark Dimmitt

Flower of Pseudobombax palmeri. Photo: Mark Dimmitt

Leaf of Pseudobombax palmeri. Photo: Mark Dimmitt

 


Pseudobombax palmeri growing on a rocky arroyo bank east of Alamos, Sonora. Photo: Mark Dimmitt

Pseudobombax palmeri green fruits. Photo: S.A. Meyer

 


Pseudobombax palmeri during rainy season near Alamos, Sonora. Photo: S.A. Meyer

Pseudobombax palmeri usually occur as isolated trees, but here is a grove of several near Alamos, Sonora. They stand out because they are among the first to yellow at the end of the rainy season Photo: Mark Dimmitt